Celibacy in the 21st century and the age of millennials

This is such an important topic, especially in the promiscuous society in which we live. Relationships are not meant to be tried on like a pair of shoes or a new wardrobe. It’s important to get to know each other through courtship before marriage. Living together first to see if it’s going to work out isn’t the same thing as being married because you don’t have the same level of commitment. Reblogged from https://pocketsfullofloveblog.wordpress.com

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Growing up, I never felt as if I had to wait. I never felt pressure from my peers or family members to wait until marriage to have sex, especially not from most of my hormone and emotion driven peers. The general rule was once you were 18, you could do whatever you wanted to do. Yet, something changed for me when I became a Christian, started to develop a relationship with God, and learned that sex was originally intended for marriage. It was then that I felt compelled to, and decided to wait until marriage to have sex. Since then, I’ve had some near calls, but I’ve kept my commitment to myself and God. That is why I’ve been pleasantly surprised in recent years to find more people who are choosing to remain chaste until marriage. Some of them are in their twenties, some of them aren’t. Some of them…

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Things My Mom Taught Me About Life

If we would all teach our children these values we would have far less crime and far more compassion and self-respect. Reblogged from https://pocketsfullofloveblog.wordpress.com

pocketsfullofloveblog

In honor of Mother’s Day this month and my lovely mother who passed away in December of 2017 from pancreatic cancer, this month’s blog post is dedicated to her, our bond, and the things she taught me in life. Below are a few important things that she taught me about life and how to live it.

  1. My mother taught me to stand up for myself, to never let anyone half-love me, and not to be a push-over. Because of her I know my worth.
  2. She taught me to believe in myself. She taught me to follow my heart, and to chase my dreams confidently without doubting myself or abilities.
  3. My mom taught me to save money for a rainy day or hard times. She taught me to handle all financial matters myself, so that no one can manipulate or use me.
  4. She taught me to keep going in life when…

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Why You Should Have An Agent And How To Get One

K.M. Allan, imho, is one of the best writing advice gurus today. Her advice is always practical and easy to understand.

K.M. Allan

If you’ve been following my blog for the last few weeks, you’ll know I attended the KidLitVic writers conference.

There, I gleaned many a tip on the publishing industry, including the following about snagging an agent.

Alex Adsett from Alex Adsett Publishing Services and Jacinta Di Mase from Jacinta Di Mase Management provided their expertize for this panel and let all the agent-less writers know exactly what an agent does and how to get one.

Why You Should Have An Agent

If you can get an agent (and realistically that’s a big IF), they will provide writers with the following benefits:

  • A chance to frog-leap the slush pile.
  • Deliver to publishers a book they know has been vetted (which works in your favor).
  • Provide another set of eyes to ensure your MS has what it needs to be a structurally sound and polished.
  • Expert advice about who is the right publisher…

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Readers of Historical Fiction…

Hi, everyone.  Thank you for joining me today.  As you know, I don't often try to draw attention to myself, but today is an exception. I need the help of my friends and fans.  I just posted the last chapter of Frienemies on Chapter Buzz, where writers can post their works in progress and get feedback.  But … Continue reading Readers of Historical Fiction…

The Basic Scene Checklist

Thank you so much for sharing this timely advice. Always a good idea to check your work before sending it off. Reblogged from https://kmallanblog.wordpress.com

K.M. Allan

I don’t know about you, but when I write, I don’t really plan.

Sure, I might have an idea of what I want to write about, but generally, I’ll write until something takes shape.

That creative freedom is what I love about writing. It’s also a double-edged sword because you’ve got to somehow make sense of that creative chaos once the words are written.

In the past, I’ve just reversed outlined the first draft and gone on my merry editing way, tweaking things based on my own ideas and feedback from betas.

That worked well for years, when past me didn’t know how to show and not tell, or that her MS was full of unnecessary stage direction.

Now I’ve learned these things and more, I know the difference giving your creativity some structure can make. I’m also no longer worried that analyzing each scene for character arcs…

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Traveling: Water Conservation

We are now in the area of Santa Fe, NM.  It is called the "Land of Enchantment" with good reason.  The landscape changes from shrub covered knolls, rolling hills, and mountains of purple, terra cotta, and everything in between; from rugged rock to sand, to a mixture of both on the same mountainside in a … Continue reading Traveling: Water Conservation

How To Spot And Eliminate Stage Directing In Your Writing

Another great post on what NOT to do in writing if you want to keep your readers interested. Reblogged from https://kmallanblog.wordpress.com

K.M. Allan

When you’ve been writing long enough, you discover what you’re good at.

It might be snapping out witty dialogue, awesome plot outlining, or creating characters so beloved even someone with a black soul would shed a tear at their demise.

You also discover amongst these writing strengths, what your writing weaknesses are. For me, that nemesis is stage directing.

For those unaware, stage directing is when you can’t help but write every single move a character makes. This takes the form of describing everything they see in unnecessary detail and every physical move beyond what’s needed.

So how can you tell if you’re adding essential detail or too much stage directing? If you’re lucky, a beta reader will point it out. It might not feel like luck at the time, and it’ll definitely damage your writing heart (and ego) to hear it, but learning this harsh truth will make…

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