Make Your Readers Cry: Writing Emotional Scenes

Allison, Thank you so much for this post. Writing/displaying emotion is one of my pitfalls. It doesn’t come easy. And I have read and watched the Hunger Games books/movies. Looking forward to future tells. Reblogged from https://theryanlanz.com

A Writer's Path

by Allison Maruska

I watched The Hunger Games last night. I read the book before the movie came out, and I’ve seen the movie a few times. So I obviously knew what would happen. Still, a certain scene got me.

By that, I mean it made me weepy.

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Writing Tips For Great Scenes

This is timeless, great advice for all writers, even those who have been successful for years. Sometimes we get stuck and the characters don’t cooperate, won’t tell us their secrets. Reblogged from https://kmallanblogwordpress.com

K.M. Allan

If the thought of writing a novel freaks you out, first, know you’re not alone. Second, this seemingly huge task is not as overwhelming as you think it is.

Sure, you have to come up with characters, plot lines, unique ideas, master show, don’t tell, and learn how to use commas properly. And it could take months or even years to write all the words you’ll need to tell the story, but it can be done. How? By writing scene-by-scene.

Breaking your novel into smaller sections of work is Productivity 101 and will allow you to concentrate on just one specific scene and not think about what else you have to do to get your book written. That’s my first tip for a great scene. For the rest, keep reading…

Writing Tips For Great Scenes

Know What Kind Of Scene It Needs To Be

As a general rule:

  • The…

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Lily: A Short Story, has reached the last 50!

I definitely want to read the rest of this story. Great writing, Stevie Turner. Love the cover with the young lady painting. Reblogged from https://stevie3.wordpress.com

Stevie Turner

One fervently hopes this is the last time I’ll need to ask for votes for a while.  Thanks to all who have voted so far.  Apparently ‘Lily: A Short Story’ has now amassed 58 votes and has moved up into the echelons of the last 50 covers for the AllAuthor Cover of the Month contest.  The next and final round will narrow it down to the last 24.

Er… can I please ask for your votes again by clicking on the AllAuthor link below?  Thanks so much!

https://allauthor.com/cover-of-the-month/3485/

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6 Submission Mistakes

These are very helpful tips for submitting manuscripts. Some I already knew; some were new to me. I think it is important to share this information so others who are struggling with rejections may learn what to do and what not to do. Reblogged from https://kmallanblog.wordpress.com/

K.M. Allan

The hard work isn’t over when you type “The End” on your final draft, nor does it finish after months of editing.

If you’re a writer who wants to see your manuscript published traditionally, you’ll need to work on a submission package for agents and publishers. If you want to give your MS the best chance of standing out in the slush pile, that should include avoiding these 6 submission mistakes.

Not Checking It Every time You Submit

You might think it’s over the top to double-check a submission before hitting send if you’ve read it a million times and know for sure it’s correct, but you know what? That’s what the typos want you to think.

Those little gremlins are always there, tricking your eyes. I sent off three submissions last week, and on the third one, I still found a typo even though I was positive the…

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2018 Top 5: #3- 7 Tips to Being Dramatic . . . In Fiction

This post helps clarify some things for me. Now I just need to practice doing it. Reblogged from https://legendsofwindermere.com

Legends of Windemere

This post originally went live on February 14, 2018.  Weird that the first of the Top 5 are from early in 2018.

Yahoo Image Search

Adding drama into your writing can be tough and many are leery about adding this due it skewing toward the negative.  Yet, it’s fairly unavoidable if you sit down and consider what can be born from it.  We may even add it without realizing what we’re doing.  There are days I think we all have different views and definitions of drama.  Some people consider it a genre while others call it a literary tool.  So, are there any tips that can cross every genre and be seen as universal?

  1. Drama tends to be seen as highly emotional, which means it can be the cornerstone of conflict.  When a person or character goes through change, they have emotions that guide them just as much as…

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6 New Agents Seeking YA, Sci-Fi, Literary Fiction, Horror, Memoir & More – by Erica Verrillo…

Chris, thank you so much for sharing this information. Reblogging on thekingskidchronicles. Reblogged from https://thestoryreadingapeblog.com

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

Here are six new agents seeking to expand their client lists. Tia Mele is looking for MG and YA. Justin Brouckaert is seeking literary and speculative fiction. Timothy Barry represents memoir and fiction. Kelly Oden is interested in literary and speculative fiction. Anne Tibbets represents adult science fiction, fantasy, thrillers, and horror, with the occasional crossover YA. Amy Stapp is interested in women’s fiction, mystery, suspense, historical fiction, young adult, and select narrative nonfiction.

Always check the agency website before submitting. Agents may switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements can change.

Get full details HERE

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Head Count

This is a very helpful post (at least to me, with only two novels under my belt, and struggling with the rewrite of the first one) about developing characters and how many to include in a novel. Reblogged from https://writenook.wordpress.com

The Write Nook

We’ve talked about killing off characters more than once on this blog…but today we’re discussing how many characters you should keep ALIVE to complete your tale.

counting.gif

First of all, you need yourprotagonist. Usually there is only one of these but sometimes there are more. It takes a certain type of writer to have more than one protagonist.

Character count: 1

Next up, we have the deuterangonist. Or more commonly known as the sidekick. Let the confusion start here. Limit your sidekick to a single being, or two. To this we say: have fun. They’re very important characters who need to be just as well-crafted as the protagonist. If you’re still getting the hang of writing, stick to one.

Character count: 2

The antagonist becomes our next character to focus on. Don’t be fooled though; the antagonist doesn’t always have to be another person. Your protagonist…

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Turning an Idea into a Plot

M. L., thank you so much for sharing this. I’m almost finished with the rough draft of the re-write of my first novel and am stuck on trying to tie the clues together. Whether or not this solves my problem, I know it will help with the next novel. Thanks again. Reblogged from https://uninspiredwriters.com

Uninspired Writers

Good morning writers, I hope you’ve had a great week.

I took a little time out this week, and took myself to Edinburgh for a few days. It’s an amazing city, and my aim was to spend some time alone, plotting novel 2 ahead of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month).

Whether you’re planning to take part in NaNo or not, you may sometimes find yourself struggling to turn an idea into a full plot. I know do. So I’m going to share with you my method for turning a fledgling idea into a full story outline. (Please note, this is not a guaranteed guide, it works for me but may not work for everybody.)

Take a look at the following eight steps, to turn your novel idea into a plot:

1. Spend some quiet time thinking
The first thing I do when I have the stirrings of a new…

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Using Short Stories to Plot a Rough Draft

One of the simplest formulas I’ve ever read on plotting. This is something I can do. Ryan, thank you so much for allowing other writers/authors to share this guest post. Reblogged from https://ryanlanz.com

A Writer's Path

by Steven Capps

Let’s discuss plotting. Not the evil, “let’s take over the world” kind, though I guess that does fit. I’m talking about the events that create a story. Specifically, I’m talking about the events that create my stories and how I go about developing them.

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