…Authors… How to be a Successful Writer…

Love the way this man writes. His sense of humor comes alive. He keeps everything simple and lets his Scottish heritage come through.

Seumas Gallacher

… this ol’ Scots Jurassic scribbler formally joined the ranks of the global writers’ diaspora over a decade ago… I use the term ‘formally’ there, because informally, the creative pens-crafting has been with me prob’ly since birth, which seems about a coupla hundred years ago… at infant and primary school in my hometown of Docklands, Govan in Glasgow, we children were introduced to ‘Composition’, the name used before the college level description, ‘Essay-writing’… no matter how short the offering, even if only a page or two,  it was drummed into us to have ‘an introduction’, ‘a middle‘, and ‘an ending‘… as an early starter in reading books supposedly beyond my years, I habitually ‘borrowed big words’ from novels and from the dictionary, force-feeding them into my ‘Compositions’… the teen years crept up stealthily on me, and resulted in the angst-ridden poetries and short stories, so…

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3 Rules I knew but never knew I knew #amwriting

This is such a great refresher on grammar; I just have to share it. Reblogged from https://conniejjasperson.com

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

In English, as in other languages, certain rules of speech are learned so early on in life that they are instinctual. No matter the level of our education or the dialect we speak, we use these rules and don’t know we are doing so.

Today I have three wonderful quotes on these rules from linguist Steven Pinker, editor Stan Carey, and Tim Dowling, journalist for The Guardian.

The Jolly Green Giant rule:

The rule is that multiple adjectives are always ranked accordingly: opinion, size, age, shape, colour, origin, material, purpose. Unlike many laws of grammar or syntax, this one is virtually inviolable, even in informal speech. You simply can’t say My Greek Fat Big Wedding, or leather walking brown boots. And yet until last week, I had no idea such a rule existed. Tim Dowling, for The Guardian, Sept 13, 2016

Word order is why certain…

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