Thoughts on revisions and self-editing #amwriting

Every published work needs editing before publication. Many articles have been written on the value of editing, even a few books. Some indicate an author can self-edit; some say it’s impossible to self-edit. Read the article posted here and do your own evaluation. Reblogged from https:/conniejjasperson.com

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

New and beginning authors often (loudly) assert their ability to edit their own work. If you are “editing” your own manuscript, you have a fool for a client. There is no such thing as self-editing—the best you can do is make revisions and admire your work. For that reason, we need other eyes on our work.

As authors, we see what we intended to write rather than what was written. We misread clumsy sentences and overlook words that are missing or are included twice in a row.  If you are in a critique group, you have a great resource in your fellow authors—they will spot things you have overlooked your work just as you do in theirs.

The first draft of any manuscript is the story as it flowed out of your mind and onto the paper. Yes, there is life and energy in your words, but your manuscript is not publishable at…

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Horses Can Be Dangerous

This is an interesting photo with an intriguing legend. I’m not into superstition and legends but I have a trilogy in the works (on the shelf for now) that involves characters with Scottish heritage. It might fit in well with some of the history of at least one of my characters. However, if you, the reader, are also an author, and use it in one of your books, please let me know so I won’t copy it in mine. It may be at least another year before mine gets done–probably two. Reblogged from https://writenook.wordpress.com

The Write Nook

On this fine Wednesday, we’re talking about a very strange legend from Scotland. This creature can transform into a variety of other creatures…but from my research, I couldn’t find what the creature appeared to be when not transforming into another creature…Help?


kelpie.jpg

Kelpie Scotland

“Water horse that lures victims to ride on its back to their doom.”

Basic Facts:

  • The name “kelpie” is suspected to be a slang/mash-up of a couple of Scottish Gaelic words. “Cailpeach” or “colpach” are just a couple to name and these can be loosely translated to heifer or colt.
  • Since they’re most commonly known as a water horse, they typically can be found near a river or stream.
  • In their horse form, they attract children. But they’re not limited to only one form; they can turn into almost anything! An example is a beautiful woman, to lure a man out to the stream, where she…

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