Them Old Cotton Fields Back Home

Well, we are home everywhere we go since we take our home with us.

Yesterday we took an excursion into Memphis to see some sights. We got up late due to not being able to sleep well the night before. By the time we got there and found the downtown welcome center it was almost noon. We had stopped at the travel center earlier and picked up some brochures of local interests. One of them had a rather extensive list of things to do, places to see, and restaurants. Maps were at the back of the brochure showing the trolley routes.

Due to a late start and taking the time to decide what we wanted to see first, which trolley to catch, and what direction it was going, we didn’t get to the Cotton Museum until 2:00.

We took the tour and learned a lot. Tourists are allowed to take pictures, which is nice. We didn’t get to the upper floor but were told it has been preserved in its original 1930’s appearance. The upper floor was the cotton exchange. The history is rich and vibrant, with many displays of the various uses of cotton. Did you know that our currency is made from cotton fiber? Some of our paper is made from cotton.

It was interesting to see and feel the trough with the recycled denim being used for household insulation. It is better for the environment and much gentler to handle than its fiberglass counterpart.

Mannequins displaying various types of clothing made from cotton adorned one display case. Some of the clothing was vintage 1930’s. One was a military uniform. Other display cases housed artifacts used in bygone eras which were used to produce and weave cotton.

There were four computer stations with headsets included to watch and hear video presentations on the subject.

Upon entry into the first section of the museum a large LCD screen may be turned on to enable hearing the history of the Memphis area and the impact the cotton trade had on its growth and development. The video highlighted the types of people involved in the industry and their impact on society.

The second room had displays showing the progress in harvesting the cotton, the modern weaving processes, and a couple of games to test your knowledge.

Tomorrow’s post will highlight the downtown area.

Emotional Beats: Ways to Portray Desire

Another great installment on showing emotion instead of telling from best-selling author Nicholas Rossis. Reblogged from https://nicholasrossis.wordpress.com

Nicholas C. Rossis

Emotional Beats | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Read for free with KU

Last month, I mentioned the launch of Emotional Beats: How to Easily Convert your Writing into Palpable Feelings. As promised, here is the first installment from the book. It lists beats you can use to convey desire.

Desire

Many of the reactions mentioned in surprise, fear and nervousness may also be present with desire; for example, an increased heart rate; a reddening of the cheeks; talking faster etc. Here are some physical reactions pertaining to desire alone:

  • A low and pleasant hum warmed his blood.
  • Her brain fizzled.
  • She forgot her left from her right.
  • Her thoughts wouldn’t line up. Every time she tried to align one, it tumbled down, scattering the rest.
  • She imagined herself melting, just sliding onto the floor in a puddle of hormones and liquid lust.
  • Thinking about it gave her sharp palpitations.
  • Those feelings took over and turned her…

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Emotional Beats: Ways to Portray Fear and Nervousness (part 2)

More help from a great sci-fi writer, Nicholas Rossis. Helping others work through the process of showing emotion instead of just using words. Reblogged from https://nicholasrossis.wordpress.com

Nicholas C. Rossis

Emotional Beats | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Read for free with KU

Last month, I mentioned the launch of Emotional Beats: How to Easily Convert your Writing into Palpable Feelings. As promised, here is the next installment from the book. It lists beats you can use to convey:

Fear and Nervousness (part 2)

Physical symptoms

These are some of the things that may happen when a person is scared or nervous:

  • They may feel hot or cold, may shiver or sweat.
  • The breathing changes. Usually, it becomes faster and shallower, though for some people it may deepen and slow down.
  • The palms may become damp, the mouth dry, the stomach tight, the throat clogged.
  • The voice may change: A rushed voice. An off-pitch laugh. A voice that breaks, drops or raises in pitch; a change in speech patterns.
  • Micro hesitations may show fear: delayed speech, throat clearing, slow reaction time.
  • A forced smile, laugh or verbally agreeing/disagreeing…

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Emotional Beats: Ways to Portray Relaxation

Great help for writers who struggle with “show don’t tell.” Reblogged from https://nicholasrossis.wordpress.com

Nicholas C. Rossis

In September, I published Emotional Beats: How to Easily Convert your Writing into Palpable Feelings. As promised, I will be posting the book on my blog. So, here is the next installment, listing beats you can use to convey:

Relaxation

Emotional Beats | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Read for free with KU

In a sense, this category is the flip side of fear and anger. Whereas people experiencing fear tighten their muscles and adopt a closed-body stance, untroubled people have relaxed muscles and an open body posture:

  • He unclenched his fists.
  • Her arms dropped at her sides.
  • He unclutched his chest.
  • He leaned against the wall.
  • She folded her hands in her lap.
  • She clasped her hands behind her back.
  • He propped his chin on his hand.
  • She rested her chin on her palm.
  • She crossed her ankles in front of her.
  • She stretched.
  • He yawned.
  • He puffed out his chest.
  • She thrust out her chest.
  • She…

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