No Hot Water Needed

We are currently in the northern part of Nevada. It is so hot here we don't need the water heater turned on to get hot water for showers, washing dishes, etc. Likewise, our society (including our politicians) are so heated up with their own agenda that we have people fighting and killing each other over … Continue reading No Hot Water Needed

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Thoughts on revisions and self-editing #amwriting

Every published work needs editing before publication. Many articles have been written on the value of editing, even a few books. Some indicate an author can self-edit; some say it’s impossible to self-edit. Read the article posted here and do your own evaluation. Reblogged from https:/conniejjasperson.com

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

New and beginning authors often (loudly) assert their ability to edit their own work. If you are “editing” your own manuscript, you have a fool for a client. There is no such thing as self-editing—the best you can do is make revisions and admire your work. For that reason, we need other eyes on our work.

As authors, we see what we intended to write rather than what was written. We misread clumsy sentences and overlook words that are missing or are included twice in a row.  If you are in a critique group, you have a great resource in your fellow authors—they will spot things you have overlooked your work just as you do in theirs.

The first draft of any manuscript is the story as it flowed out of your mind and onto the paper. Yes, there is life and energy in your words, but your manuscript is not publishable at…

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Horses Can Be Dangerous

This is an interesting photo with an intriguing legend. I’m not into superstition and legends but I have a trilogy in the works (on the shelf for now) that involves characters with Scottish heritage. It might fit in well with some of the history of at least one of my characters. However, if you, the reader, are also an author, and use it in one of your books, please let me know so I won’t copy it in mine. It may be at least another year before mine gets done–probably two. Reblogged from https://writenook.wordpress.com

The Write Nook

On this fine Wednesday, we’re talking about a very strange legend from Scotland. This creature can transform into a variety of other creatures…but from my research, I couldn’t find what the creature appeared to be when not transforming into another creature…Help?


kelpie.jpg

Kelpie Scotland

“Water horse that lures victims to ride on its back to their doom.”

Basic Facts:

  • The name “kelpie” is suspected to be a slang/mash-up of a couple of Scottish Gaelic words. “Cailpeach” or “colpach” are just a couple to name and these can be loosely translated to heifer or colt.
  • Since they’re most commonly known as a water horse, they typically can be found near a river or stream.
  • In their horse form, they attract children. But they’re not limited to only one form; they can turn into almost anything! An example is a beautiful woman, to lure a man out to the stream, where she…

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Heaven and Hell: Are They Real?

If you have ever wondered if there really is an afterlife, or if it is all just a fairytale, click on the following link to get this book for free for the next four days.  The author of the book shares his experiences, given by God, to share with skeptics, gnostics, philosophers, and seekers of … Continue reading Heaven and Hell: Are They Real?

The Catskills, by Asher Brown Durand 1858

I wholeheartedly agree with the above sentiments regarding this painting. Art that represents God’s creation, even in an ethereal, fairytale manner, leaves us with the mystery of why God would surround us with such beauty. Reblogged from https://conniejjasterpson.com

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

Quote from Wikimedia Commons on The Catskills: This painting was commissioned by William T. Walters in 1858, when the 62-year-old Durand was at the height of his fame and technical skill. The vertical format of the composition was a trademark of the artist, allowing him to exploit the grandeur of the sycamore trees as a means of framing the expansive landscape beyond. Durand’s approach to the “sublime landscape” was modeled on that of Thomas Cole (1801-48), founder of the Hudson River school of painting. The painters of this school explored the countryside of the eastern United States, particularly the Adirondack Mountains and the Catskills. Their paintings often reflect the Transcendental philosophy of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-82), who believed that all of nature bore testimony to a spiritual truth that could be understood through personal intuition.

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Quote from Wikipedia (the fount of all knowledge): Asher Brown Durand is remembered particularly…

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How to take a great photograph

If you love photography, this site does a superb job (in my humble opinion) of defining what makes a good photograph. Reblogged from https://heritagecalling.com/

Heritage Calling

Ahead of the launch of our photography exhibition Spirit of the North, artist and photographer John Kippin shares his top tips for creating great images (on your camera phone or otherwise).

What makes a good photograph?

Liverpool Docks, Merseyside. A man stands in the foreground looking out to the river Liverpool Docks, Liverpool, Merseyside [ part of Spirit of the North series ] © John Kippin 2018 For most of us a good photograph is one that is in some way special to us. It might be a picture of people or places that we like to be reminded of, perhaps something that we once were or something that invokes a particular emotional response. A ‘bad photograph’ might show something that we find disagreeable, uninteresting, or worse.

For some people the idea of a ‘good photograph’ is located within the technical and aesthetic requirements of photography. (i.e. that that photographs look like paintings).

The ruined wreck of an aircraft in a field with mountains and greay clouds in the behind HIDDEN. National Park Northumberland © John Kippin

Photography is deceitful…

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WIP Wednesday [June 2018]

Authors Helping Authors: Want to see what some authors are writing about? Want to discover new authors? Check out this site and learn a little bit about author Rachel Poli. Reblogged from https://rachelpoli.com

Rachel Poli

We’re already just about halfway through June, which is unbelievable to me. I know I say this a lot, but I feel like 2018 just started, let alone the month of June.

But anyway, here’s what I’ve been working on this month.

WIP Wednesday: June 2018 | Work in Progress | Creative Writing | Blogging | RachelPoli.com

George Florence & The Perfect Alibi

I’ve been working on rewriting this book, the first in the mystery series. I was hoping this would be my last draft, but I ended up making some major changes to the plot. So I’m going to finish rewriting the draft and go from there.

To have it finished by the end of the month, I’ve been writing about 25 pages a day. So far, it’s been going pretty well.

Brave

I’m working on writing the first draft of my next Wattpad story, a fantasy filled with adventure and dragons. I’ve been writing one chapter each day I work on it (which…

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Ten Writer’s Habits I’ve Acquired. Which to Kick, Which to Keep? – By Pamela Schloesser Canepa…

This post is a great help for authors struggling to find balance in their lives while trying to hold down a job and still find time to write. It is also helpful for those of us who are easily distracted and need to find a routine that works. Reblogged from https://thestoryreadingapeblog.com

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

It happened the first time I committed to NANOWRIMO. I became a slightly different person, a more intense version of myself. In looking back at the last two years since becoming a self-published author, I realize how much I’ve changed. Here is a list of ten habits I acquired when I decided to stop writing in isolation and become a published author.

1. Likely the most common habit, I started losing track of the time at night. This is because I was either in writer’s groups on Facebook learning or staying up chasing an idea. When this happens, it means you are catching the spark. Be thankful. It’s not a bad habit. It certainly beats falling asleep in front of a TV show.

2. Getting hooked on a favorite show on Netflix (Hulu, Roky, whatever). Please don’t confuse this with falling asleep in front of the TV. This habit is…

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#Bookreview – For the Sake of a Child by Stevie Turner

Although I have not read this book, and may not since I suspect there is some rough language in it, I feel the subject matter is very important in our society today. I applaud anyone who has the knowledge and courage to fight this evil epidemic. Reblogged from https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com.

Robbie's inspiration

For the Sake of a Child

What Amazon says

Ginny Ford is pleased to win the coveted job of housekeeper to the directors of PhizzFace Inc. However, her joy becomes tarnished by an accidental find whilst cleaning, leading her to suspect that all is not as it should be on the managerial corridor. Delving deeper, she is shocked to uncover corruption and a secret paedophile network that has remained hidden for years, involving the very people she has come to know and trust. Unable to live with her conscience any more, she decides that she cannot keep quiet and that she must find a way of helping all the children involved. However, by trying to help the children she discovers that she has unwittingly put her entire family at risk…..

My review

I listened to the audio book of this haunting story about the dark and disturbing world of pedophilia. The narrator, Janine Haynes, had a…

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“I lost my will to write.” How this author bounced back and became an award winner

Meet author Kaitlyn Abdou, a budding author who doesn’t know the meaning of “give up.” Reblogged from https://whatinspiresyourwriting.wordpress.com

What Inspires Your Writing?

Writers Who Are Making It Happen: Kaitlyn Abdou

Welcome to the first installment of Writers Who Are Making It Happen, where I feature writers who, quite frankly, don’t mess around. These determined novelists aren’t just talking the talk, they’re walking the walk. Anyone can say, “I want to write a novel,” but it takes a certain kind of writer to actually do it. These brave souls are telling fear and self-doubt where to go, receiving valuable feedback on ChapterBuzz, and steadily venturing into the exciting world of writing success. Becoming a published author requires commitment, dedication, and enthusiasm. These are the writers who are making it happen!

(Want to make it happen for yourself? Join us in the Better Writers Club.)

Award-winning author Kaitlyn Abdou This is quite a promising year for Kaitlyn Abdou and the fantasy novel she’s currently in the throes of writing, The Daffodil Witch.

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